These products usually contain vitamins, minerals, herbs or hormones that claim to enlarge the penis. Despite their impressive claims, there's absolutely no clinical evidence that these products work and some may even be harmful. The University of Maryland in the US carried out an analysis on some of these and found traces of lead, pesticides, E. coli bacteria and animal faeces.
Some surgical methods have the most evidence of effectiveness, whereas others have fairly frequent complications, sometimes severe, including scarring that lead, ultimately, to penis shrinkage or erectile dysfunction.[1][2] Noninvasive methods have received little scientific study, and most lack scientific evidence of effectiveness, although scientific evidence supports some elongation by prolonged traction.[3] Some quack products may improve penis erection, mistaken by consumers for penis enlargement.
"They're a complete waste of time," says Professor Wylie. "Pills and lotions have no proven benefit. If they were effective, they would be on sale at chemists. Using a lotion may help a man become more familiar with his penis, which some men shy away from. So lotions can help a man become more comfortable with his penis but they certainly won't make it any bigger."
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